Sarah Boden/WESA

Sarah Boden covers health, science and technology for 90.5 WESA. Before coming to Pittsburgh in November 2017, she was a reporter for Iowa Public Radio where she covered a range of issues, including the 2016 Iowa Caucuses.

Sarah’s reporting has appeared on NPR’s Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition Saturday and WBUR's Here and Now. She has won multiple awards, including a regional Edward R. Murrow for her story on a legal challenge to Iowa's felon voting ban.

Latest by Sarah Boden/WESA


Duquesne epidemiologist says vaccine distribution is like a ‘train wreck in slow motion’

Less than 42% of the more than 1 million vaccine doses allocated to Pennsylvania have been distributed, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

By Sarah Boden/WESA

UPMC inoculates remote employees, while other frontline workers wait for COVID-19 vaccine

The state’s largest health care system has been vaccinating non-clinical and non-patient facing staff, including those who work at home, employees say.

By Sarah Boden/WESA, Kiley Koscinski/WESA and Liz Reid/WESA

Head of Allegheny County board of health says highly contagious U.K. variant is likely already in western Pa.

Some infectious disease researchers estimate that the U.K. variant will become the predominant strain on this side of the Atlantic by March.

By Sarah Boden/WESA

ICU nurse says UPMC leaders paint inaccurate depiction of COVID’s impact on hospital system

“There’s no time in between each death to kind of collect yourself and mourn for that person,” said Jodi Faltin, who cares for COVID-19 patients in the intensive care unit at UPMC Shadyside.

By Sarah Boden/WESA

Pa. has yet to announce which essential workers will get COVID-19 vaccine first

Currently, health care workers and high-ranking government officials are the only people with access to the vaccine in Pennsylvania.

By Sarah Boden/WESA

Allegheny County Health Dept. head says statewide coronavirus mitigation efforts needed

Some have wondered why Allegheny County hasn’t taken more decisive action and broadened restrictions, similar to actions taken in Philadelphia last month. The head of Allegheny County’s health department said that acting alone wouldn’t be very effective because surrounding areas also have surging rates of coronavirus infections.

By Sarah Boden/WESA

Wolf hesitates to take more aggressive action despite accelerating spread of COVID-19

While the tone of Gov. Tom Wolf’s press briefings has grown increasingly foreboding, he has yet to order another shutdown like was seen in the spring.

By Sarah Boden/WESA

Allegheny County passes somber milestone with more than 1K COVID-19 cases

Allegheny County reported 20 new deaths—including one person in their 40s, and another in their 50s. The large number of fatalities was expected as hospitalizations have rapidly risen for weeks. 

By Sarah Boden/WESA
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