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Penn State researchers ask: Any natural predators for spotted lanternfly?

  • Scott LaMar
An adult spotted lanternfly in Salford Township, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania.

Brian Henderson / Flickr

An adult spotted lanternfly in Salford Township, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania.

Airdate: July 22, 2022

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The spotted lanternfly has made its return to Pennsylvania. The invasive species seems to be everywhere in some places.

For several years, there was no known natural predator to the invasive spotted lanternfly.

But, as more studies have cropped up, researchers are finding that several animals like to make a meal out of the pests.

At Penn State University, one study has asked the public for help.  Researchers say they’re using a “community science approach” to gather data about which species of birds and other predators are eating spotted lanternfly.  They’re also looking at how frequently they eat them.

Kelli Hoover, Professor of Entomology, Centers for Chemical Ecology, Insect Biodiversity and Pollinator Research at Penn State University appears on Tuesday’s Smart Talk to discuss the lanternfly and how to control the insect.

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