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New $10M history center complex in Gettysburg will include museum and more than 1 million historical items

New $10M history center complex in Gettysburg will include museum and more than 1 million historical items

 Photo provided

New $10M history center complex in Gettysburg will include museum and more than 1 million historical items

A new museum will open in the Gettysburg area next year.

Beyond the Battle Museum is scheduled to open early next year. The museum will be part of the Adams County Historical Society’s new 29,000-square-foot history center complex at 625 Biglerville Road in Cumberland Township, Adams County.

Within this new facility will be a research library and archives, event venue, education center, and the museum, which will house twelve exhibit galleries.

“Part of the Historical Society’s collection of over one million historic items, these precious objects have been housed in an unsafe environment for decades, putting the community’s history at grave risk,” the organization said in a news release.” This will change next year when the new history center opens to the public and thousands of artifacts will be displayed for the first time ever.”

Photo by Jake Boritt for Adams County Historical Society

Gov. Tom Wolf tours the future “Beyond the Battle” museum

The project has garnered nearly $10 million in support, including $2.8 million in commitments from the state through its Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program to support the museum and specifically to develop a climate-controlled environment for an extensive collection of artifacts.

“The events of Gettysburg’s history – from the battle to Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address – are some of the most formative events of our nation’s history,” Gov. Tom Wolf said in a news release. “I’m honored to ensure their preservation with this $2.8 million investment, these stories of history must live on.”

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