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Former Peace Corps volunteers tell their stories of working in Ukraine

  • Scott LaMar
Women and children, fleeing from Ukraine, sleep at a makeshift shelter in the train station in Przemysl, Poland, Thursday, March 3, 2022. More than 1 million people have fled Ukraine following Russia's invasion in the swiftest refugee exodus in this century, the United Nations said Thursday.

 Markus Schreiber / AP Photo

Women and children, fleeing from Ukraine, sleep at a makeshift shelter in the train station in Przemysl, Poland, Thursday, March 3, 2022. More than 1 million people have fled Ukraine following Russia's invasion in the swiftest refugee exodus in this century, the United Nations said Thursday.

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Airdate: Thursday, March 24, 2022

Before the Russian invasion last month, Ukraine was a thriving European nation. Today, the images we see are of smoking ruins in some cities and millions of Ukrainians leaving the country, looking for safety.

Ukraine’s transition to success didn’t come overnight. When the Soviet Union collapsed, Ukraine gained its independence in the early 1990s. It wasn’t easy to go from repressive Communism to democracy and establish viable institutions, government and an economy.

The U.S. Peace Corps worked in Ukraine to help the people who struggled as their lives changed in so many ways.

Three former Peace Corps volunteers, who worked in Ukraine, appear on Thursday’s Smart Talk to describe their experiences and observations about Ukraine.

Joining us are Greg Dwyer, Michelle Garren, and Amber Footman.

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