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Groups go to court against Senate election review

Fighting subpeona for voters' personal data

  • Scott LaMar
FILE - A canvas observer photographs Lehigh County provisional ballots as vote counting in the general election continues, Nov. 6, 2020, in Allentown, Pa. A review by The Associated Press in the six battleground states disputed by former President Trump has found fewer than 475 cases of potential voter fraud, a minuscule number that would have made no difference in the 2020 presidential election. Democrat Joe Biden won Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin and their 79 Electoral College votes by a combined 311,257 votes out of 25.5 million ballots cast for president. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, file)

AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, file

FILE - A canvas observer photographs Lehigh County provisional ballots as vote counting in the general election continues, Nov. 6, 2020, in Allentown, Pa. A review by The Associated Press in the six battleground states disputed by former President Trump has found fewer than 475 cases of potential voter fraud, a minuscule number that would have made no difference in the 2020 presidential election. Democrat Joe Biden won Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin and their 79 Electoral College votes by a combined 311,257 votes out of 25.5 million ballots cast for president. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, file)

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Airdate: Wednesday, December 22, 2021

Last month State Senate Republicans agreed to pay an Iowa consulting firm $270,000 over the next six months to review the 2020 election in Pennsylvania. They say the review is designed to determine the flaws that exist in the election system and fix them through legislation.

Skeptics argue the real impetus for the effort is to satisfy former President Donald Trump’s unsubstantiated claims of election fraud.

Three advocacy organizations and eight voters have gone to court to fight a subpoena issued by the Senate Intergovernmental Operations Committee that wants voters’ names, addresses, dates of birth, driver’s license numbers and partial social security numbers.

On Wednesday’s Smart Talk, we’re joined by Robin Roberts – one of the voters challenging the subpoena – and Vic Walczak, the American Civil Liberties Union- Pennsylvania legal director to explain their opposition to providing the information.

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