Skip Navigation

Native American paths have become state parks in Pa.

  • Scott LaMar
The lowest parts of Turkey Path Trail are along a series of waterfalls at Colton Point State Park.

PA DCNR

The lowest parts of Turkey Path Trail are along a series of waterfalls at Colton Point State Park.

Listen to Smart Talk every weekday at 9am and 7pm on WITF 89.5 & 93.3. You can also stream WITF radio live on our website or ask your smart speaker to “Play WITF Radio.”

Airdate: Tuesday, December 21, 2021

Pennsylvania has 141 state parks and forests. About half of them have names or paths that derive from Native American tribes that once lived in Pennsylvania. In fact, some of the state parks grew out of American Indian paths.

Indigenous people lived in what is now Pennsylvania for at least 20,000 years and European colonists for just 400, so there is a lot of history on the land that is now a state park or forest.

Tuesday’s Smart Talk addresses that history with Angie Jaillet-Wentling, a cultural resources programs coordinator with the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Bureau of State Parks and Ashley Barry, a park ranger working at the Laurel Hill State Park Complex.

 

.

Support for WITF is provided by:

Become a WITF sponsor today »

Up Next
Smart Talk

Affordable housing is on everyone's wish-list