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Name image and likeness rights law is a game changer for collegiate athletes

Also on the program: Project Rattle Cam – Tracking behaviors of rattlesnakes to understand the nature of these often maligned creatures.

FILE PHOTO: In this April 19, 2019, file photo, an athlete stands near a NCAA logo during a softball game in Beaumont, Texas. The NCAA is poised to take a significant step toward allowing college athletes to earn money without violating amateurism rules. The Board of Governors will be briefed Tuesday, Oct. 29 by administrators who have been examining whether it would be feasible to allow college athletes to profit of their names, images and likenesses. A California law set to take effect in 2023 would make it illegal for NCAA schools in the state to prevent athletes from signing personal endorsement deals.

Aaron M. Sprecher / AP Photo

FILE PHOTO: In this April 19, 2019, file photo, an athlete stands near a NCAA logo during a softball game in Beaumont, Texas. The NCAA is poised to take a significant step toward allowing college athletes to earn money without violating amateurism rules. The Board of Governors will be briefed Tuesday, Oct. 29 by administrators who have been examining whether it would be feasible to allow college athletes to profit of their names, images and likenesses. A California law set to take effect in 2023 would make it illegal for NCAA schools in the state to prevent athletes from signing personal endorsement deals.

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Airdate: Wednesday, July 7, 2021

Should college athletes be paid was a question asked for decades as college sports — especially football and basketball — rivaled professional sports in popularity that included in-person attendance, TV audiences and merchandise sold.

Within just the last few weeks, the question was answered and athletes are in line to be compensated — not for playing, but for the use of their names, images and likenesses.

On Wednesday’s Smart Talk, we discuss game changing decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court and the NCAA that allow athletes to be compensated.

Appearing on the program is Casey Floyd, Co-Founder and Chief Compliance Officer, NOCAP Sports.

Project RattleCam tracks rattlesnake behavior

The power of community is being tapped to better understand the secretive rattlesnake. Project RattleCam is seeking help from community scientists to sort through literally thousands of images taken inside a rattlesnake rookerie.

iStock

A black phase Timber Rattlesnake basking on a rock.

In summer, female rattlesnakes gather in rookeries to have babies and scientists have placed cameras in one area to capture all of the action.

This project partners Dickinson College in Carlisle, with California Polytechnic State University, and the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Scott Boback, Ph.D., is an animal ecologist and Professor of Biology with Dickinson College and he joins Smart Talk Wednesday to share details about the project.

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