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Smart Talk: NY Times reports Rep. Perry part of plan with Trump to challenge Georgia election

  • Scott LaMar
Republican U.S. Rep. Scott Perry of Pennsylvania listens to speakers at a party rally with volunteer canvassers, Saturday, Oct. 6, 2018 in Harrisburg, Pa. A court-ordered redrawing of Pennsylvania's House districts has forced several Republican congressmen, including Perry, into more competitive seats and helped establish Pennsylvania as a key state for Democrats aiming to recapture the House majority.

Marc Levy / Associated Press

Republican U.S. Rep. Scott Perry of Pennsylvania listens to speakers at a party rally with volunteer canvassers, Saturday, Oct. 6, 2018 in Harrisburg, Pa. A court-ordered redrawing of Pennsylvania's House districts has forced several Republican congressmen, including Perry, into more competitive seats and helped establish Pennsylvania as a key state for Democrats aiming to recapture the House majority.

 

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Airdate: Monday, January 25, 2021

The New York Times reported this weekend that Republican Congressman Scott Perry, who represents Dauphin and portions of Cumberland and York Counties, collaborated with former President Donald Trump in a scheme to overturn legally certified election results in Georgia.

The Times reported Perry connected Trump with Philadelphia lawyer Jeffrey Clark, who was an acting assistant attorney general at the U.S. Justice Department and who was sympathetic to Trump’s effort to push an election-fraud lie to stay in power. It said Trump considered firing acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen, who was not willing to pursue Trump’s claims in the swing state.

Monday’s Smart Talk looks at the fallout from the report.

Also on the program, there are 67 counties in Pennsylvania, each one with unique municipalities and governing demands. The 2020 election proved to be an enormous challenge for all of them.

Each year, the state’s County Commissioners assemble a list of legislative priorities that best represent the interests of all of them. In 2021, their top priority is election reform based on each county’s experience during the November General Election.

Because county governments provide direct human services to their constituents, their priorities are often high stake. The 2021 legislative priorities reflect this.

Joining us on Monday’s Smart Talk to detail the 2021 County Government priorities are Lisa Schaefer, executive director of the County Commissioners Association of Pennsylvania, and Kevin Boozel, CCAP president and a Butler County commissioner.

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