would require photo ID issued by PennDOT, an accredited Pennsylvania college or university, or a Pennsylvania care facility.   Bowser said it’s not uncommon to see court challenges to voter ID laws – something that’s already been threatened by at least one civil rights group in Pennsylvania.     This week in Wisconsin, a judge found that the recently implemented voter ID law would have a disproportional impact on minorities.  The case still hasn’t gone to trial, but in the meantime, the judge halted the implementation of the voter I-D law – a hold the state could appeal.   Bowser said in the 15 years she's worked in the election law field, she hasn’t seen many more polarizing issues than voter ID.   “It’s probably the most partisan issue I’ve tracked, and it falls very starkly on partisan lines, with Republicans tending to favor voter ID and Democrats tending to oppose it,” said Bowser.  “There are a few notable exceptions, but that’s the general truth.”   Exceptions include Ohio, where an effort to make voter ID law more strict was publicly opposed by the Republican secretary of state.  Conversely, Rhode Island’s Democrat-controlled legislature passed a new voter ID law last year, the only Democrat-majority legislature to do so, said Bowser.   Wednesday’s vote in the Pennsylvania Senate was largely partisan, with no Democrats voting for the bill.  Three Republicans voted against the bill – Jane Earll (Erie), Stewart Greenleaf (Montgomery), and Mary Jo White (Venango).  Earll and White are retiring this year."> would require photo ID issued by PennDOT, an accredited Pennsylvania college or university, or a Pennsylvania care facility.   Bowser said it’s not uncommon to see court challenges to voter ID laws – something that’s already been threatened by at least one civil rights group in Pennsylvania.     This week in Wisconsin, a judge found that the recently implemented voter ID law would have a disproportional impact on minorities.  The case still hasn’t gone to trial, but in the meantime, the judge halted the implementation of the voter I-D law – a hold the state could appeal.   Bowser said in the 15 years she's worked in the election law field, she hasn’t seen many more polarizing issues than voter ID.   “It’s probably the most partisan issue I’ve tracked, and it falls very starkly on partisan lines, with Republicans tending to favor voter ID and Democrats tending to oppose it,” said Bowser.  “There are a few notable exceptions, but that’s the general truth.”   Exceptions include Ohio, where an effort to make voter ID law more strict was publicly opposed by the Republican secretary of state.  Conversely, Rhode Island’s Democrat-controlled legislature passed a new voter ID law last year, the only Democrat-majority legislature to do so, said Bowser.   Wednesday’s vote in the Pennsylvania Senate was largely partisan, with no Democrats voting for the bill.  Three Republicans voted against the bill – Jane Earll (Erie), Stewart Greenleaf (Montgomery), and Mary Jo White (Venango).  Earll and White are retiring this year."> would require photo ID issued by PennDOT, an accredited Pennsylvania college or university, or a Pennsylvania care facility.   Bowser said it’s not uncommon to see court challenges to voter ID laws – something that’s already been threatened by at least one civil rights group in Pennsylvania.     This week in Wisconsin, a judge found that the recently implemented voter ID law would have a disproportional impact on minorities.  The case still hasn’t gone to trial, but in the meantime, the judge halted the implementation of the voter I-D law – a hold the state could appeal.   Bowser said in the 15 years she's worked in the election law field, she hasn’t seen many more polarizing issues than voter ID.   “It’s probably the most partisan issue I’ve tracked, and it falls very starkly on partisan lines, with Republicans tending to favor voter ID and Democrats tending to oppose it,” said Bowser.  “There are a few notable exceptions, but that’s the general truth.”   Exceptions include Ohio, where an effort to make voter ID law more strict was publicly opposed by the Republican secretary of state.  Conversely, Rhode Island’s Democrat-controlled legislature passed a new voter ID law last year, the only Democrat-majority legislature to do so, said Bowser.   Wednesday’s vote in the Pennsylvania Senate was largely partisan, with no Democrats voting for the bill.  Three Republicans voted against the bill – Jane Earll (Erie), Stewart Greenleaf (Montgomery), and Mary Jo White (Venango).  Earll and White are retiring this year."> Senate passes voter ID | State House Sound Bites | witf.org
State House Sound Bites

Capitol reporter Mary Wilson covers Pennsylvania politics and issues at the Pennsylvania state capitol.

Senate passes voter ID

Written by Mary Wilson, Capitol Bureau Chief | Mar 8, 2012 4:17 AM

After a nearly party-line vote (23-26) in the state Senate, a voter ID bill heads to the House, where it’s expected to get a concurrence vote and go on to the governor. 

 

Right now, photo ID at the polls is required by federal law the first time someone votes at a precinct.  

 

Jenny Bowser, a senior fellow at the National Conference of State Legislatures, said that’s due to the 2002 Help America Vote Act.

 

“The HAVA-approved voter ID list includes things like a utility bill, or a paycheck, or a government document,” she said.  “It’s not restricted to a short list of photo I-Ds.”

 

The voter ID bill that just cleared the Pennsylvania Senate would require photo ID issued by PennDOT, an accredited Pennsylvania college or university, or a Pennsylvania care facility.

 

Bowser said it’s not uncommon to see court challenges to voter ID laws – something that’s already been threatened by at least one civil rights group in Pennsylvania.  

 

This week in Wisconsin, a judge found that the recently implemented voter ID law would have a disproportional impact on minorities.  The case still hasn’t gone to trial, but in the meantime, the judge halted the implementation of the voter I-D law – a hold the state could appeal.

 

Bowser said in the 15 years she's worked in the election law field, she hasn’t seen many more polarizing issues than voter ID.

 

“It’s probably the most partisan issue I’ve tracked, and it falls very starkly on partisan lines, with Republicans tending to favor voter ID and Democrats tending to oppose it,” said Bowser.  “There are a few notable exceptions, but that’s the general truth.”

 

Exceptions include Ohio, where an effort to make voter ID law more strict was publicly opposed by the Republican secretary of state.  Conversely, Rhode Island’s Democrat-controlled legislature passed a new voter ID law last year, the only Democrat-majority legislature to do so, said Bowser.

 

Wednesday’s vote in the Pennsylvania Senate was largely partisan, with no Democrats voting for the bill.  Three Republicans voted against the bill – Jane Earll (Erie), Stewart Greenleaf (Montgomery), and Mary Jo White (Venango).  Earll and White are retiring this year.

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