Smart Talk

Smart Talk is a daily, live, interactive program featuring conversations with newsmakers and experts in a variety of fields and exploring a wide range of issues and ideas, including the economy, politics, health care, education, culture, and the environment.  Smart Talk airs live every week day at 9 a.m. on WITF’s 89.5 and 93.3.

Listen to Smart Talk live online from 9-10 a.m. weekdays and at 7 p.m. (Repeat of 9 a.m. program)

Host: Scott LaMar

Holocaust Remembrance Day/Author Patrick Sharkey on falling crime

Written by Scott LaMar, Smart Talk Host/Executive Producer | Apr 12, 2018 4:07 AM
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What to look for on Smart Talk Thursday, April 12, 2018:

On January 20, 1942, fifteen high-ranking Nazi party and government leaders assembled outside of Berlin, at a villa by a lake known as Wannsee. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the "final solution to the Jewish question in Europe."

The "final solution" was the Nazi' code name for the planned genocide of all European Jews.

After the Wannsee Conference, the Nazis began the planned, systematic deportation and murder of Jews from all over Europe. Ultimately, more than six million European Jews died; two-thirds of the known population.

Thursday is Holocaust Remembrance Day, the nation's annual commemoration of the Holocaust. Remembrance Day was established by Congress to remember the victims and their suffering, and not allow the truth of what happened to fade into history.

Appearing on Thursday's Smart Talk is Lt. Col (retired) Ray Millen a Professor of Security Sector Reform at the Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute, Carlisle Barracks. He will discuss the events that transpired at Wannsee and the "final solution" to the German plan.

Pamela Weinberg is a local author and educator, who's parents survived the Holocaust. They met and married as refugees in the United States following the war, and she is in the studio to share their experience. 

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Pamela Weinberg and Dr. Ray Millen

Also, violent crime has dramatically diminished over the last 30 years, even in cities that have a reputation of violence. In 1974, Chicago, for example, had 970 homicides. That number dropped to 650 last year and seems like it will continue to drop in years to come.

In the newly released book, Uneasy Peace: The Great Crime Decline, the Renewal of City Life, and the Next War on Violence, author Patrick Sharkey delves into the reasons why violence in the country has dropped so much and if it will continue.

Patrick Sharkey joins us on Thursday's Smart Talk to discuss his new book and current crime trends in the U.S.

Sharkey appears at Mid Town Scholar Bookstore in Harrisburg Thursday night at 7.

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