Smart Talk

Smart Talk is a daily, live, interactive program featuring conversations with newsmakers and experts in a variety of fields and exploring a wide range of issues and ideas, including the economy, politics, health care, education, culture, and the environment.  Smart Talk airs live every week day at 9 a.m. on WITF’s 89.5 and 93.3.

Listen to Smart Talk live online from 9-10 a.m. weekdays and at 7 p.m. (Repeat of 9 a.m. program)

Host: Scott LaMar

Smart Talk: What you need to know about prostate health

Written by Scott LaMar, Smart Talk Host/Executive Producer | Sep 15, 2015 10:25 AM

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What to look for on Smart Talk Tuesday, September 15, 2015:

Prostate cancer is one of the most curable cancers.  When diagnosed in its early stages, prostate cancer can be treated with a high degree of success.

However, prostate cancer presents few symptoms in its early stages and that's why screening is so very important.

But the screening process is often avoided because many find it unpleasant.

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month and one of the themes in Pennsylvania for the campaign is "Don't Fear the Finger."  It's not a slogan one would forget easily and that's the idea.  Don't Fear the Finger may raise eyebrows but it also is designed to reduce anxiety about prostate screening and remind men to get screened in the first place.

The American Cancer Society estimates almost 228,000 Americans will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2015.  Some 28,000 will die of it.  African-American men are at higher risk for developing prostate cancer.

On Tuesday's Smart Talk, we'll try to answer all you questions about prostate cancer.  

Appearing on the program are Kristine Warner, Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Prostate Cancer Coalition, Dr. Scott Owens with Urology of Central Pennsylvania and Vice Chairman of Surgery and Divisional Chief of Urology at PinnacleHealth, and prostate cancer survivor Retired Colonel James E. Williams Jr.

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Dr. Scott Owens with Urology of Central Pennsylvania and Vice Chairman of Surgery and Divisional Chief of Urology at PinnacleHealth, prostate cancer survivor Retired Colonel James E. Williams Jr., and Kristine Warner, Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Prostate Cancer Coalition.

For more health news and information visit TransformingHealth.org. Supported by Penn State Hershey Medical Center and WellSpan Health.

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  • Radio Smart Talk img 2015-09-15 09:22

    Listener emails:

    I realize that most research has shown that screening and treatment is needed but there has been some science showing that some prostate cancer will not ever kill a man and that treating this kind of prostate cancer actually causes more anxiety and death.

    Is it still recommended that men get screened and treated as frequently as it was in the past?

  • Radio Smart Talk img 2015-09-15 09:23

    Manuel from Carlisle emails:

    Can you guests speak to the relationship with regular sexual activity and continued prostate health?

  • Radio Smart Talk img 2015-09-15 09:25

    Victor emails:

    Please address the possible and likely dibillitating side effects that result from surgery to remove a cancerous prostrate.

  • Radio Smart Talk img 2015-09-15 09:25

    A listener emails:

    Regarding breast cancer advocacy versus prostate cancer advocacy..

    One thing that seems out of balance between breast cancer and prostate cancer is that with breast cancer treatment and recovery.. insurance companies have to pay for reconstructive surgery even if someone was just biopsied due to breast cancer advocacy, this means that insurance companies have to pay for women who want their breasts restructured if they just had a lump removed but …

    prostate cancer survivors deal with masculine side effects of treatment (not necessarily cosmetic but with a potentially similar emotional side effect as breast reconstruction) like Erectile Dysfunction (ED) but treatment for that is not necessarily covered

    it makes me think the breast cancer advocates should move on to prostate cancer issues so that men will get equal treatment.