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Hosted by: Scott LaMar



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witf introduces 'Smart Talk Friday' radio program

RST: Prostate cancer awareness; Drive Out Suicide campaign

Written by Scott LaMar, Smart Talk Host/Executive Producer | Sep 25, 2013 2:46 PM

What to look for on Radio Smart Talk, Thursday, September 26, 2013:

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There are many awareness campaigns, usually stretched over a month or a week.  One of the most important is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month during September.

Why?

Not just because more than 200,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year or that 30,000 die from it.

Awareness is significant because prostate cancer often shows no symptoms and is sometimes only detected through a prostate cancer screening.

The prostate is a small walnut-shaped gland that produces the seminal fluid that nourishes and transports sperm.

If detected early, prostate cancer can be successfully treated.  The key is finding the cancer in its early stages.

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Fred Maddux left and Dr. Jay Raman right

Appearing on Thursday's Radio Smart Talk is Dr. Jay Raman,  an Associate Professor of Surgery in the Division of Urology at the Penn State Hershey Medical Center and Fred Maddux of Elizabethville, PA who has survived prostate cancer.

Also, one of life's great tragedies is that thousands of people die from suicide each year, including about 1,500 here in Pennsylvania.

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We all probably know of someone who has taken their own life or is familiar with a person that feels so depressed, sad, or hopeless that they have considered suicide.

There is help and resources available to prevent suicide.  Often, all it takes is a phone call or a friend or loved one reaching out and offering support.

A unique awareness and prevention campaign kicked off this week called Drive Out Suicide.  Rebecca May-Cole, co-chair of the Pennsylvania Adult/Older Adult Suicide Prevention Coalition, joins us to explain.

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Rebecca May-Cole

More resources are available at preventsuicidepa.org 

If you or someone you know is thinking about suicide, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline number. 1-800-273-TALK

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Comments: 3

  • steven first img 2013-09-26 08:26

    The doctor is intentionally not telling you how a biopsy is done.... It does not just involve probes up the rectum. They insert a pincer device up the urethra that cuts out parts of your prostate. There is a reason your guest was unconscious for the procedure! Also I would like to hear some discussion on the HIGH likelihood of false positives in PSA screening.

    • Healthyman img 2013-09-26 11:11

      A prostate biopsy does not involve inserting a pincer device into your urethra.

      It sounds like you had something else done.

  • Radio Smart Talk img 2013-09-26 08:38

    Alison emails:

    My husband survived testicular cancer ten years ago. At age 48 during his regular testicular follow-up, his urologist suggested, "We might as well run a PSA test while we're at it."

    The biopsy found he had testicular cancer in 6 fields. He had surgery using the DaVinci machine and has recovered function and health.
    We're very grateful the doctor went ahead with a test even though he's relatively young. When he went for surgery orientation, most of the men looked like they were in their 70s or older -- but there were at least 3 other young guys in the room.

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