Smart Talk

Smart Talk is a daily, live, interactive program featuring conversations with newsmakers and experts in a variety of fields and exploring a wide range of issues and ideas, including the economy, politics, health care, education, culture, and the environment.  Smart Talk airs live every week day at 9 a.m. on witf’s 89.5 and 93.3.

Listen to Smart Talk live online from 9-10 a.m. weekdays.

Hosted by: Scott LaMar



Smart Talk Friday is a fast-paced program featuring thoughtful and engaging conversations about the politics, policy and people who are shaping Pennsylvania’s future. Host Matt Paul and witf Capitol Bureau Chief Mary Wilson invite your multimedia interaction before, during and after the program.

Hosted by: Matt Paul and Mary Wilson



witf introduces 'Smart Talk Friday' radio program

RST: Living well with a disability

Written by Scott LaMar, Smart Talk Host/Executive Producer | Aug 21, 2013 3:01 PM

What to look for on Radio Smart Talk, Thursday, August 22, 2013:

disabled women with kids 300 x 210.jpg

There was a time when children born with disabilities were hidden or weren't spoken of, unless they were described as a personal or family tragedy.  Even adults with disabilities were thought of as less of a person if they lived with a disability.  President Franklin Roosevelt is an example of someone who concealed a disability because he didn't want to appear weak.

The world and thinking toward those living with a disability has changed a great deal.  Today, the emphasis is not on what one can't do, but what they can do while living with a disability.

A first-of-its-kind conference is being held this weekend in Lancaster that will draw interest from across the country.

It's called Living Well with a Disability.  According to the organizers, the idea behind the event is to "challenge people with disabilities to pursue dreams that previously might have seemed impossible."

Those who attend will be able to test new technology, hear from national celebrities with disabilities, can participate in adaptive sports, and even get tips on dating.

Thursday's Radio Smart Talk will feature two organizations that work with and support people living disabilities and who will describe what living well with a disability means.

Appearing on the program will be Theo Braddy, the executive director of the Center for Independent Living of Central PA, Zainab Jama, the executive director of Pennsylvania Statewide Independent Living Council. And Christine Ha, author and winner of “MasterChef” season 3. She discusses her cooking journey as a chef who is blind.

Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for LivingWellDisability8.22.13Ha.jpg

Theo Braddy, Zainab Jama, Christine Ha

Tagged under , , , , , , ,

back to top

Post a comment

Comments: 5

  • Radio Smart Talk img 2013-08-22 08:40

    Anne writes:

    I am enjoying the conversation, but as a mother of a child with autism (non-verbal, intellectual disability) my child's disability is not physical and adaptations such as curb cuts, etc. do not help him integrate into society at large. Many of our kids make noises, have behaviors that seem odd to the majority of the population. What adaptations have been made to help our kids/adults access society and to foster a cultural shift to the way of thinking towards our family members?

    • Theo Braddy img 2013-08-22 12:22

      Anne, unfortunately what will help your son better integrate into society is for society to be better informed and educated about children with autism as well as people with disabilities in general. This lack of knowledge
      often causes people to react inappropriately not knowing what to do or say. We naturally try to avoid what makes us feel uncomfortable. As a person living with a disability I have experience this fear. We must continue to educate and foster real encounters between those with and without disabilities. Only then can we build real understanding with a true inclusive community.

    • Theo Braddy img 2013-08-22 12:23

      Anne, unfortunately what will help your son better integrate into society is for society to be better informed and educated about children with autism as well as people with disabilities in general. This lack of knowledge
      often causes people to react inappropriately not knowing what to do or say. We naturally try to avoid what makes us feel uncomfortable. As a person living with a disability I have experience this fear. We must continue to educate and foster real encounters between those with and without disabilities. Only then can we build real understanding with a true inclusive community.

  • Radio Smart Talk img 2013-08-22 08:41

    Anne writes:

    I am enjoying the conversation, but as a mother of a child with autism (non-verbal, intellectual disability) my child's disability is not physical and adaptations such as curb cuts, etc. do not help him integrate into society at large. Many of our kids make noises, have behaviors that seem odd to the majority of the population. What adaptations have been made to help our kids/adults access society and to foster a cultural shift to the way of thinking towards our family members?

  • lynn4home img 2013-08-24 21:35

    Can't wait to go to Living Well with a Disability on Sunday! People should go whether or not they, or family or friends, have a disability. Its an opportunity to get acquainted with people and gain knowledge about the progress that's been made in terms of attitudes and technology.

Smart Talk Sponsors

CBC300x75
pinnaclehealth300x75

witf's Public Insight Network

Support for witf is provided by:

Become a witf sponsor today »