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Smart Talk is a daily, live, interactive program featuring conversations with newsmakers and experts in a variety of fields and exploring a wide range of issues and ideas, including the economy, politics, health care, education, culture, and the environment.  Smart Talk airs live every week day at 9 a.m. on witf’s 89.5 and 93.3.

Listen to Smart Talk live online from 9-10 a.m. weekdays.

Hosted by: Scott LaMar



Smart Talk Friday is a fast-paced program featuring thoughtful and engaging conversations about the politics, policy and people who are shaping Pennsylvania’s future. Host Matt Paul and witf Capitol Bureau Chief Mary Wilson invite your multimedia interaction before, during and after the program.

Hosted by: Matt Paul and Mary Wilson



witf introduces 'Smart Talk Friday' radio program

RST: Commercial real estate trends; Non-farmers with their own source for eggs

Written by Scott LaMar, Smart Talk Host/Executive Producer | Aug 26, 2013 3:43 PM

What to look for on Radio Smart Talk Tuesday, August 27, 2013:

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The economic recovery still may be sluggish but commercial real estate investments appear to be on the rise.  In fact, gross income for realtors who deal in commercial real estate has increased for several years in a row nationally. 

This takes into account commercial sales, leasing, apartment and retail buildings, property management, and development. 

So what does it mean for the economy overall and what trends do we see regionally?  The Central Penn Business Journal will host the 8th annual Real Estate and Development Symposium in Hershey Lodge next week.

We'll get a preview of the trends and how the economy is impacted by commercial real estate sales and investments on Tuesday's program.

Joining us are Larry Kluger, president of Journal Multimedia and Robin Zellers, president of NAI CIR, a commercial real estate firm.

Also, we’ve produced a few programs recently on the "eat foods that have been produced locally" movement. 

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Some non-farm families in Central Pennsylvania have taken it a step further.  They are raising chickens in their backyards. 

In a poll conducted by the 200,000 member website www.backyardchickens.com, 92% say they raise chickens to get fresh eggs. 

But not everyone wants chickens in their neighborhoods and municipalities have developed ordinances to deal with the issue.

Appearing on the program is Nicole Fortney of Dauphin County, who raises chickens in her back yard and Phil Ehlinger, Executive Director, Pennsylvania Association of Zoning Officials.

Listen to the program:

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Comments: 2

  • Colette Cope img 2013-08-27 07:36

    My fiance and I recently bought a home and being allowed to have raise chickens was one of our "must haves." That made the search extremely difficult. We researched zoning laws in an endless number of townships, sent our realtor countless houses that we thought would work, only to find out there would be a neighborhood organization instead. We found a good number of properties on sizable and extremely private plots of land that still didn't qualify because of zoning. It's really frustrating that zoning laws cover such large areas when you can find sizable plots of land within the zones where the neighbors wouldn't even see the chickens. It's also frustrating that our state is so fractured into so many different townships, making researching the zones very time consuming. Needless to say, we wound up moving "to the country," in an area much further out than our target area. We're building a coop this fall and getting chicks in the spring!

  • Sarah Hopkins img 2013-08-27 08:51

    Wanted to correct a misperception that may have come across with your first interview - you do NOT need a rooter to get eggs. You can have just hens and will have peace and quiet and plenty of eggs!

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