On-Air Highlights

Summer series from NPR

Written by Fred Vigeant, Director of Programming and Promotions for TV and Radio | Jun 5, 2014 8:32 AM
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Freedom Summer  (early June on Morning Edition and All Things Considered)

In the summer of 1964, civil rights groups began a program with a simple name and a grand goal. The Mississippi Summer Project was aimed at helping black citizens get into the political system they’d been shut out of, and out of a host of social ills. The project would become known as Freedom Summer. Hundreds of activists, many of them white college students, flooded into the state from around the country. What followed was months of hard work, heroism and violence that shocked the nation. Before the summer was over, the Civil Rights Act was signed into law and the civil rights movement had reached a point of no return.  Fifty years after that tumultuous time, NPR reporters examine the events and issues around the movement. 

Book Your Trip  (Begins June 16 and continues into July on Morning Edition and All Things Considered)

NPR’s Arts & Entertainment Desk looks at the theme of modes of travel in books --  Eric Deggans on Freedom Summer, Neda Ulaby on Snowpiercer, Elizabeth Blair on The Little Engine That Could, Mandalit del Barco on motorcycles, Lynn Neary on travel disasters, and more.

All Thing Considered's Man Series (begins June 23)

What does it mean to be a man in America today? This summer, All Things Considered explores that question through a combination of reporter pieces, show interviews, commentaries, and listener call-outs. A cradle-to-grave framework is divided into three sections: how boys learn to be men (education and development); issues of young adults (identity and defining masculinity); and issues of full Adulthood (work and homelife). Follow the conversation in social media via the hashtag #nprman.

World Cup 2014 (mid June on all NPR News programs)

The World Cup arrives in Brazil this summer for international football's biggest tournament. The U.S. team  is among 32 qualified nations to compete, and will open against Ghana's squad on June 16. NPR reporters covering the Cup for  radio, online and social media include Tom Goldman and Lourdes Garcia-Navarro. The Cleats blog returns with contributions from staff in Brazil and soccer followers on NPR's staff in the U.S.

Summer Star Gazing  (Weekend Editions beginning June 21 through August 17)

Summer is a prime season for star gazing -- it's warm, families gather under the stars, and there are plenty of celestial events. Tune in for stories on the Summer Solstice, the best planetariums, star parties, the International Space Station, the season's meteor showers, and more.

Rhythm Section (Morning Edition and All Things Considered the week of June 23)

We might not realize it but rhythms are in just about everything we see and hear.  They’re what make us move, and what move us. NPR's Music and Arts & Entertainment desks explore the power of rhythm in music, culture, science and everyday life. Look for segments on the heartbeat, the Waltz, poetry, President Obama's speeches, those who lack rhythm, and more.

Anniversary Of The Civil Rights Act (Morning Edition and All Things Considered the week of June 30)

As part of Code Switch's Freedom Summer series, NPR looks at the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Understanding Risk  (All Things Considered the week of July 7)

Most of us really don't understand risk at all, and yet our daily lives are filled with it. Just think about the barrage of news reports that are fueled with the notion: the chance of rain, the chance of getting a cold or a more severe disease, or the chance of getting hit by a car. And yet the human brain isn't wired to understand the percentages that confront us. Host Robert Siegel and producer Andrea Hsu venture into the world of probability and risk.

The Colors Series (All NPR News programs in August)

NPR's Arts & Entertainment and Science Desks collaborate to examine how we perceive colors.

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