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Cosby judge delays some evidence rulings until jury sworn in

Written by The Associated Press | Jun 1, 2017 1:28 PM
bill_cosby_nov16_3.jpg

Bill Cosby, center, arrives for a hearing in his sexual assault case at the Montgomery County Courthouse on Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016, in Norristown, Pa. On Tuesday, Cosby's lawyers pressed a judge to keep the comedian's damaging deposition in a decade-old lawsuit out of his sexual assault trial, saying Cosby agreed to answer questions under oath after being assured he wouldn't be charged with a crime. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

(Norristown) -- The judge in the Bill Cosby case says he will wait until a jury is sworn in before final rulings on what evidence can be used when the comedian goes on trial Monday near Philadelphia.

Defense lawyers sparred with prosecutors Thursday before Cosby goes on trial on charges he drugged and molested a woman in 2004.

Montgomery County Judge Steven O'Neill says he will allow expert testimony on victims' behavior as long as he finds the psychologist's testimony valid and relevant. He says he wants to keep some arguments private until he swears in the jury.

The defense wants to block the drug expert from testifying about quaaludes because they say Cosby last possessed the sedative years before he met the accuser.

Prosecutors say they were available on the black market in the early 2000s.

An earlier story appears below.

(NORRISTOWN) -- Lawyers for Bill Cosby hope to exclude expert testimony about quaaludes and the behavior of sex assault victims when the comedian goes on trial Monday near Philadelphia.

Defense lawyers are sparring with prosecutors Thursday for perhaps the final time before Cosby goes on trial on charges he drugged and molested a woman in 2004.

Montgomery County Judge Steven O'Neill says he will allow expert testimony on victims' behavior as long as he finds the psychologist's testimony valid and relevant.

The defense also wants to block the drug expert from testifying about quaaludes because they say Cosby last possessed the sedative years before he met the trial accuser.

But prosecutors say they were still available on the black market in the early 2000s.

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