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PA Senate approves plan to keep Penn State fine in the commonwealth

Written by Tim Lambert and The Associated Press | Jan 31, 2013 4:46 AM
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(Harrisburg) -- An effort to keep the money from Penn State's 60 million dollar fine in Pennsylvania is on its way to the state House for its consideration.

The Senate has voted unanimously in favor of the measure, several months after the NCAA imposed the fine in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky scandal. 

Republican Senator Jake Corman of Centre County is the prime sponsor and says it makes sense the money should stay in the commonwealth. "Under the measure, the funds will be used for child sexual abuse prevention efforts, trainging of mandated reporters and other victim assistance efforts, based here in Pennsylvania," he says. "The fine money would be held in a trust by the state Treasurer and distributed through the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency."

Democratic Senator Judy Schwank of Berks County favors the measure."Pennsylvania is the state of both the injury and the injured and it's the only state that is paying for the healing," she says. "For that reason, it should be the only state where the funds are spend."

Penn State agreed to the fine last summer as part of a deal that averted a potential shutdown of its football program by college sports' governing body. 

The university has already made the first of five, $12 million payments.

Governor Corbett has filed a federal anti-trust lawsuit against the NCAA over the sanctions.

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Comments: 1

  • Ketch img 2013-01-31 08:10

    This is an interesting idea. Although it will violate the United States Constitution (commerce clause). We very well can't have every state in the US enacting such silly protectionist measures. If this passes it will only be a matter of time before it is deemed unconstitutional and will cost taxpayers more money. There are much more pressing issues to deal with. At this point legislatures should be focusing on efforts to prevent such things from happening in the first place. They shouldn't be focusing on how this will look in the press but instead be thinking about the children first.

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