Earth Day was celebrated 40 years ago. Today, people across Central Pennsylvania and the globe are marking the event. Being environmentally conscious has become a way of life for some midstaters. The first Earth Day had 20 million participants, and that number has risen to more than one billion people in 190 countries. Cicely Elliott is a floral designer at the West Shore Farmers Market in Lemoyne. When she was growing up in North Carolina, Earth Day was a big celebration and she says eco-friendly behaviors were commonplace. Elliott says she could do more for the environment. "I could ride my bike more often, I could not watch television, I could recycle more, I could take shorter showers. There's always more people can do," she says. Jim Grubb of Liverpool, Perry County is a retired Pastor who's come for brunch at the Farmers' Market. He says he makes sure not to dump garbage out his car window and he conserves water because as a "caretaker" of the planet, it's his duty help ensure it's healthy. "Believe me I'm not without failure," he says. "But to do my best to keep the earth as clean and as good as it can be. And not to do anything to destroy the habitat that we have." Rich Madeira is vice president of Enginuity Energy, a midstate company that helps others develop conservation strategies. He says as environmental consciousness grows, so does the range of concerns people have about the earth. "Today when we look at the big picture as a global community, we understand that it's not just recycling," he says. "It's the air that we breathe, the water that we drink, or the water that isn't available to drink in so many third world countries." Madeira says it's time to raise the bar and make more eco-friendly behaviors widespread. Earth Day celebrations will be held at HACC's Harrisburg Campus and will include a career fair, a tech and trade symposium and the grand opening of the Green Center. WITF's Radio Smart Talk will be broadcasting live from the center from 9 am to 10 am."> Earth Day was celebrated 40 years ago. Today, people across Central Pennsylvania and the globe are marking the event. Being environmentally conscious has become a way of life for some midstaters. The first Earth Day had 20 million participants, and that number has risen to more than one billion people in 190 countries. Cicely Elliott is a floral designer at the West Shore Farmers Market in Lemoyne. When she was growing up in North Carolina, Earth Day was a big celebration and she says eco-friendly behaviors were commonplace. Elliott says she could do more for the environment. "I could ride my bike more often, I could not watch television, I could recycle more, I could take shorter showers. There's always more people can do," she says. Jim Grubb of Liverpool, Perry County is a retired Pastor who's come for brunch at the Farmers' Market. He says he makes sure not to dump garbage out his car window and he conserves water because as a "caretaker" of the planet, it's his duty help ensure it's healthy. "Believe me I'm not without failure," he says. "But to do my best to keep the earth as clean and as good as it can be. And not to do anything to destroy the habitat that we have." Rich Madeira is vice president of Enginuity Energy, a midstate company that helps others develop conservation strategies. He says as environmental consciousness grows, so does the range of concerns people have about the earth. "Today when we look at the big picture as a global community, we understand that it's not just recycling," he says. "It's the air that we breathe, the water that we drink, or the water that isn't available to drink in so many third world countries." Madeira says it's time to raise the bar and make more eco-friendly behaviors widespread. Earth Day celebrations will be held at HACC's Harrisburg Campus and will include a career fair, a tech and trade symposium and the grand opening of the Green Center. WITF's Radio Smart Talk will be broadcasting live from the center from 9 am to 10 am."> Earth Day was celebrated 40 years ago. Today, people across Central Pennsylvania and the globe are marking the event. Being environmentally conscious has become a way of life for some midstaters. The first Earth Day had 20 million participants, and that number has risen to more than one billion people in 190 countries. Cicely Elliott is a floral designer at the West Shore Farmers Market in Lemoyne. When she was growing up in North Carolina, Earth Day was a big celebration and she says eco-friendly behaviors were commonplace. Elliott says she could do more for the environment. "I could ride my bike more often, I could not watch television, I could recycle more, I could take shorter showers. There's always more people can do," she says. Jim Grubb of Liverpool, Perry County is a retired Pastor who's come for brunch at the Farmers' Market. He says he makes sure not to dump garbage out his car window and he conserves water because as a "caretaker" of the planet, it's his duty help ensure it's healthy. "Believe me I'm not without failure," he says. "But to do my best to keep the earth as clean and as good as it can be. And not to do anything to destroy the habitat that we have." Rich Madeira is vice president of Enginuity Energy, a midstate company that helps others develop conservation strategies. He says as environmental consciousness grows, so does the range of concerns people have about the earth. "Today when we look at the big picture as a global community, we understand that it's not just recycling," he says. "It's the air that we breathe, the water that we drink, or the water that isn't available to drink in so many third world countries." Madeira says it's time to raise the bar and make more eco-friendly behaviors widespread. Earth Day celebrations will be held at HACC's Harrisburg Campus and will include a career fair, a tech and trade symposium and the grand opening of the Green Center. WITF's Radio Smart Talk will be broadcasting live from the center from 9 am to 10 am."> Going green a way of life for some midstaters | News | witf.org
News

Going green a way of life for some midstaters

Written by Melanie Herschorn | Apr 22, 2010 3:44 PM

(Undated) -- The first Earth Day was celebrated 40 years ago. Today, people across Central Pennsylvania and the globe are marking the event. Being environmentally conscious has become a way of life for some midstaters. The first Earth Day had 20 million participants, and that number has risen to more than one billion people in 190 countries. Cicely Elliott is a floral designer at the West Shore Farmers Market in Lemoyne. When she was growing up in North Carolina, Earth Day was a big celebration and she says eco-friendly behaviors were commonplace. Elliott says she could do more for the environment. "I could ride my bike more often, I could not watch television, I could recycle more, I could take shorter showers. There's always more people can do," she says.

Jim Grubb of Liverpool, Perry County is a retired Pastor who's come for brunch at the Farmers' Market. He says he makes sure not to dump garbage out his car window and he conserves water because as a "caretaker" of the planet, it's his duty help ensure it's healthy. "Believe me I'm not without failure," he says. "But to do my best to keep the earth as clean and as good as it can be. And not to do anything to destroy the habitat that we have." Rich Madeira is vice president of Enginuity Energy, a midstate company that helps others develop conservation strategies. He says as environmental consciousness grows, so does the range of concerns people have about the earth. "Today when we look at the big picture as a global community, we understand that it's not just recycling," he says. "It's the air that we breathe, the water that we drink, or the water that isn't available to drink in so many third world countries." Madeira says it's time to raise the bar and make more eco-friendly behaviors widespread.

Earth Day celebrations will be held at HACC's Harrisburg Campus and will include a career fair, a tech and trade symposium and the grand opening of the Green Center. WITF's Radio Smart Talk will be broadcasting live from the center from 9 am to 10 am.

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