The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) has developed has published a new resource for families entitled Making the most of Playtime, which offers tips and strategies for families to consider when playing with their infant or toddler. It is part of the Family Tools Collection. The resource includes a list of developmentally appropriate expectations of play skills for infants and toddlers up to 36 months. Also included are suggestions for making the most of playtime. For example: Follow your child’s lead– provide a toy and wait to see what he/she does with it before initiating play. Go slowly– Try to hold off on showing your child how a toy works. Let them figure it out. Read your child’s signals– They may not be able to tell you in words when he/she has had enough, but they have other ways of telling you Look at your play space– Is the area where your child plays safe, friendly and inviting? Is there too much noise or other distractions? Play it again, Sam– Repeat, repeat, repeat. Young children love repetition. These and other great ideas can be found on CSEFEL’s website at: http://www.vanderbilt.edu/csefel/familytools/make_the_most_of_playtime2.pdf"> The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) has developed has published a new resource for families entitled Making the most of Playtime, which offers tips and strategies for families to consider when playing with their infant or toddler. It is part of the Family Tools Collection. The resource includes a list of developmentally appropriate expectations of play skills for infants and toddlers up to 36 months. Also included are suggestions for making the most of playtime. For example: Follow your child’s lead– provide a toy and wait to see what he/she does with it before initiating play. Go slowly– Try to hold off on showing your child how a toy works. Let them figure it out. Read your child’s signals– They may not be able to tell you in words when he/she has had enough, but they have other ways of telling you Look at your play space– Is the area where your child plays safe, friendly and inviting? Is there too much noise or other distractions? Play it again, Sam– Repeat, repeat, repeat. Young children love repetition. These and other great ideas can be found on CSEFEL’s website at: http://www.vanderbilt.edu/csefel/familytools/make_the_most_of_playtime2.pdf"> The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) has developed has published a new resource for families entitled Making the most of Playtime, which offers tips and strategies for families to consider when playing with their infant or toddler. It is part of the Family Tools Collection. The resource includes a list of developmentally appropriate expectations of play skills for infants and toddlers up to 36 months. Also included are suggestions for making the most of playtime. For example: Follow your child’s lead– provide a toy and wait to see what he/she does with it before initiating play. Go slowly– Try to hold off on showing your child how a toy works. Let them figure it out. Read your child’s signals– They may not be able to tell you in words when he/she has had enough, but they have other ways of telling you Look at your play space– Is the area where your child plays safe, friendly and inviting? Is there too much noise or other distractions? Play it again, Sam– Repeat, repeat, repeat. Young children love repetition. These and other great ideas can be found on CSEFEL’s website at: http://www.vanderbilt.edu/csefel/familytools/make_the_most_of_playtime2.pdf"> Parenting and Playtime | Education | witf.org
Education

Parenting and Playtime

Written by Debbie Riek, Education Coordinator | Oct 2, 2009 2:23 PM

Published in Education

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